Bone broth

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Beef Bone Broth Recipe

Beef Bone Broth Recipe By Natasha Mason, Nourish Melbourne The benefits of drinking bone broth have been so well documented, I don't need to rewrite them here. I personally love to...

Beef Bone Broth Recipe

Beef Bone Broth Recipe
By Natasha Mason, Nourish Melbourne

The benefits of drinking bone broth have been so well documented, I don't need to rewrite them here. I personally love to drink it for its gut health benefits, as well as having extra when I have an injury (really really good for joint injuries, in particular). I have been making it for a couple of years now, and I think I've come up with my best recipe yet, which is why I'm sharing it here. If you're after some good reading about the benefits of consuming this 'liquid gold for your gut', then here are a couple of resources:

> Health Benefits of Bone Broth, Body + Soul
> Bone Broth, One of Your Most Healing Diet Staples, mercola.com

Recipe makes approx. 3 litres of bone broth. Keeps in the fridge for one week, otherwise please freeze in smaller containers which you can defrost and consume within two days, once thawed.

I recommend leaving 36 hours between the start and finish of this recipe.

WHAT YOU NEED

> 1.5-1.7kg of organic/grass-fed beef marrow bones (the guys at Hagens Organic Meats and Gary's Quality Meats will know exactly what you're after. Just make sure you buy organic or at least bones from grass-fed animals).
> 3 tbsp apple cider vinegar (helps boost the extraction of minerals and enzymes from the bones)
> 1/2 cup tomato passata
> 1 small-medium sized onion, cut into large slices
> 2 celery sticks, roughly cut into 5cm lengths
> 2 small-medium sized carrots, peel left of, cut in half, and half again lengthways
> 4 cloves of garlic, peeled and cut in half
> 1 tbsp dried oregano
> 1 tbsp black pepper corns
> 2 tsp himalayan pink salt flakes
> 2 tsp chilli flakes

WHAT TO DO

1. Place your bones in a large, heavy bottomed pot. (I used a cast iron pot). Cover with filtered water until bones are just covered, ensuring you leave at least 1 inch of space between the level of water and the top of the pot.
2. Add all of the remaining ingredients, and place on the stove top, brining to the boil.
3. Once it hits a simmer, turn down to the lowest flame setting and place the lid on. (I then move my pot to the small hob).
4. Come back about after about half an hour, take the lid off, and check for any impurities which will rise to the surface. (This can happen from about the 20min point, for the first two hours). These impurities look frothy and foamy. Simply skim them off the surface with a spoon, and discard.
4. Once you notice there are no frothy/foamy bits (approx. in the first two hours), you can just leave your broth simmering away on a very low setting. You can also put the pot into your oven on a very low heat.
5. I like to cook mine over about a 24-36 hour period. This includes the odd turning off and on when of course having to leave the house, but all up the 'on' time should total about 18 hours. It is fine to leave the pot off overnight, and turn on again in the morning.
6. Once you've had your bones simmering for anywhere between 18-24 hours (or up to 48 hours if you have the time), let the broth cool completely before emptying all of the bones and veg. Then, strain the liquid through a sieve and pour into your containers, glass jars, or whatever containers you will use to freeze the broth. I keep about a weeks worth in the fridge (I drink a cup a day), and the rest into smaller containers in the freezer.
7. Put in the fridge overnight or for at least eight hours and when you take it out, you'll notice a layer of fat on the top (keep this for cooking!), and a wonderful, jelly like broth underneath. Simply heat as much as you need on the stove and enjoy as a hot beverage, or add where recipes require 'stock' or broth, for a super tasty meal!